leapfrog guidance specific to the technology, doled out a handful of breakthrough-device designations to brain-computer interfaces and, in April, issued its first approval to a system that translates brain signals into movements of a hand and wrist brace, allowing stroke patients to relearn how to grasp objects.

And while these rapid-fire developments make it easy to get swept up in the hype surrounding brain-computer interfaces, because of how sensitive neurotech can be, it’s important to realize that plenty of it is just that: unsubstantiated hype.

 

“More often than not, there’s a lot of people promising things that the tech can’t actually do,” Justin Sanchez, Ph.D., the technical fellow in charge of Battelle’s life sciences research business, told Fierce Medtech.

“It’s so important to get excited by the potential of neurotech and where it could go, but also to be really grounded on that technology and what it does and what science needs to happen in order to make it a reality,” he continued. “Understanding the difference between what is real and what is not when it comes to neurotech is such an important issue, and it’s one that, at Battelle, we take extremely seriously.”

Battelle’s brain-computer interface work began in the realm of spinal cord injuries with the development of a system that analyzes brain activity to detect a paralyzed individual’s intent to move their hand or arm, then uses that information to stimulate those muscles through a forearm sleeve.

That fundamental technology has since been expanded into stroke rehabilitation and, through Battelle’s long-running partnership with the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—where Sanchez was previously director of the biological technologies office—the ongoing development of a noninvasive brain-computer interface that involves an external headset and injected nanoparticles for neural stimulation.

In a Q&A with Fierce Medtech, Sanchez offered up the two major questions that can separate science from sci-fi in brain-computer interfaces and plotted out the technology’s next moves.

Read the full article here.

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区分科学与科幻:《巴特尔》的贾斯汀·桑切斯谈大脑-计算机接口的平衡

凶猛的生物技术

Andrea Park于2021年9月1日发布

脑电脑界面都是Medtech的所有愤怒,几乎每周都会带来一个新的“读取”耳机或神经元刺激植入物的首次亮相。

令人惊奇地谨慎的FDA甚至加入了十字军道。在去年,它提供了一个超越的指导具体的技术,发放了一些开创性产品名称今年4月,它首次批准了一种将大脑信号转换为手和手腕支架动作的系统,使中风患者能够重新学习如何抓取物体。

由于神经技术的敏感性,这些飞速发展的技术很容易被围绕着大脑-计算机接口的炒作所淹没,但重要的是要意识到,这些炒作大多是未经证实的炒作。

“更常见的是,有很多人有希望的事情,即科技实际上无法做到的事情,”刚果·桑切斯,博士,博士生的生命科学研究业务的技术研究员告诉凶悍的地铁。

他继续说道:“为神经技术的潜力和发展方向感到兴奋是非常重要的,同时也要真正基于这项技术,了解它的作用,了解科学需要什么,才能让它成为现实。”“在神经科技领域,理解真实和虚幻之间的区别是一个非常重要的问题,在巴特尔,我们非常重视这个问题。”

巴特尔的脑-机接口工作始于脊髓损伤领域,当时他开发了一种系统,通过分析大脑活动来检测瘫痪者移动手或手臂的意图,然后利用这些信息通过前臂袖子来刺激这些肌肉。

这项基础技术已经扩展到中风康复领域,通过巴特尔与美国国防高级研究计划局(桑切斯曾在该局担任生物技术办公室主任)的长期合作伙伴关系,正在进行一种非侵入性脑-机接口的开发,该接口包括一个外部耳机和用于神经刺激的注射纳米颗粒。

在与Fierce Medtech的问答中,桑切斯提出了两个主要的问题,这两个问题可以在脑-机接口方面将科学与科幻区分开来,并规划了这项技术的下一步发展方向。

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